CSA | Snow Peas


We're still playing catch-up with last week's veggies. I don't think we've touched any of this week's goodness, yet. Time to get to it! In this week's box is kale, onions, sugar snap peas, broccoli, new potatoes, carrots with tops, tomato, and kohlrabi.

Last week's broccoli and sungold tomatoes were tossed together with roasted red pepper and olives for a little salad, served with creamy polenta.


I was a huge fan of this dish, but Steve that it was just okay. The feta cheese was a perfect salty counterpoint to the sweet peppers.

Half of last week's peas went into this very simple orzo dish topped with toasted pecans.


This was a wonderful, quick weeknight meal, coming together in 15 minutes. I threw the chopped peas into the same pot with the pasta during the last 2 minutes of cooking time, drained, tossed with a little olive oil and topped with the nuts. Yum.

The rest of last week's beets were roasted and then tossed with lemon, cilantro, and mint. Then they were piled on top of a bed of spinach and topped with black olives. 


Steve thought that this was a confused dish. "It just doesn't make sense," he kept saying. I thought it was good, though.

Last week's broccoli and some of the cabbage were steamed and then mixed with a few of this week's potatoes, covered with cheddar cheese and broiled to make rumpledethumps, a variation of colcannon. This became a little bit of a blue plate special with the addition of grilled pork chops and stir fried snow peas.


The potato dish was good, but not great. I think it would have been far better on a cold wintery night. The peas were bright, crisp, and sweet.

Almost all of the rest of the cabbage (I still have half a pound left!) was salted and then mixed with tree ear and button mushrooms to make wanton stuffing. 


This is the one dish that we could have done without this week. We generally love steamed wantons, but they are super labor intensive, so they have to be pretty delicious to make it worth it, in my opinion. These did not rise to the occasion.

Finally, I cooked up some rice and eggs. After cooking some Madagascar pink rise I vigorously stirred in eggs and butter. The heat of the rice cooks the eggs, giving it a glossy sheen. The last of our snow peas and some onion were lightly cooked and then mixed it and the whole thing was topped with Parmesan.


This was a good way to do a variation of fried rice, using mostly the same ingredients, but getting a completely different flavor. I picked up the pink rice on a trip out of town and we loved it. Plus, it has a great story and it cooks in only 20 minutes. If it weren't 3 times the price of brown rice, I think we'd eat it all the time.

10 comments:

  1. I really do want to come and eat at your house Courtney, I'll even do the dishes! ;)

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    1. You're always welcome, Tracey. You don't even have to wash a single dish!

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  2. I'm with Tracey....your food looks so amazing!

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    1. Thanks so much, Melissa, and you can come too! There's always room at my table for guests!

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  3. I've never seen green kolhrabi! Only the purple.Your veg looks beautiful and nourishing.

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  4. I think that orzo dish is divine looking :) I love how creative you are with your box of veggies and fruits!!

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  5. Everything looks delish Courtney, loving the orzo dish, simple and it looks so tasty.

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  6. What time do you eat dinner? I never have enough time to photograph my dinners in good light. The last dish sounds so interesting. I'm going to have to try it!

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    1. We usually sit down sometime between 6 and 7. The days are starting to get noticeably shorter, so it won't be too much longer that I'll be able to snap a photo in decent light. :)

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