Tadpole to Frog



One big adventure this summer was adding some tadpoles to our family for time while they transformed into frogs. Silas and I both loved checking on them every morning, giving them a little food and watching them slowly change. It really is quite amazing!

A lady posted to one of my local Facebook groups that a tree frog had laid its eggs in her kiddie pool and she offered up tadpoles to whomever wanted to come and get them. So, Silas and I headed out there one day. She said that she was having a hard time keeping them alive inside and encouraged me to take more than I thought I wanted to account for loss. So I listened. I took a lot. A lot, a lot. We brought them home and not a single one died. Not one. This was wonderful, of course, but it also meant that I had more tadpoles than I knew what to do with. We gave away around 30 of them to friends and I still had 40 or so left.

They seemed quite content in the small aquarium that I scored at the thrift store, which we kept outside in our screened-in porch. After about two months, daily one or two would crawl out of the water and we'd set them free in the backyard.  I was surprised by how tiny they were; about the size of my fingernail. I did feel very privileged to be witness to such an amazing biological process, but I have to admit, I hit my limit. As we were pushing three months, I was ready to be done with frogs and tadpoles. So, we scooped up the last 20 into a jar and sent them with Steve to dump in a small pond by his work where I'm sure they are very happy indeed.

10 comments:

  1. We had such a great time watching our tadpoles turn into frogs this spring. But, we only had 5 and after the couple of months we had them, I was ready to set them free as well!

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    1. They are such fascinating creatures, aren't they? I'm glad I'm not the only one who gets tadpole-fatigue. ;)

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  2. When I was little and then when my babies arrived we always had a batch of tadpoles growing, then when they turned into frogs we would release them into the wild. To this day I have a fondness for little frogs, it's the big ones I'm a little afraid of. :/

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    1. We have tons of little ones in our yard, but I've yet to see a big one...and I'm glad! I think I share your aversion, Tracey!

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  3. We love doing this, always fun to watch the transformation.

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  4. What a cool, hands-on, first-hand, learning experience.

    We don't have very many frogs here. I would love for my children to experience something like this.

    I love the natural and organic learning experiences you provide for Silas.

    Wishing you a lovely week.
    xoxo

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    1. I was thinking when we released these little guys, that they are so tiny I would probably never notice them in the wild. Silas is definitely teaching me to sharpen my powers of observation!

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  5. What a great way to learn first hand about frogs! :)

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    1. It really was! I think I learned as much as Silas did!

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